'Iron rain' found on exoplanet

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Scientists have found evidence of molten iron rain driven by extreme heat on an exoplanet 640 lightyears from Earth, according to new research.

Exoplanet WASP-76b is found in the Gemini constellation where its close orbit to a star causes extreme temperatures on one side of the planet, while the other side is cooler.

According to Physics World, the conditions are hot enough to break down molecules into atoms on the side exposed to the star. On the darker side these can recombine into molecules.

The exoplanet orbits the star differently to how Earth orbits the Sun. Earth rotates as it circles the sun. The exoplanet does not.

The Guardian reports that, similar to Earth's moon, the exoplanet is "tidally locked".
This means that only one side of the planet is continually exposed to the star, while the other is locked in darkness.

It's these conditions that are believed to create the exoplanet's extreme weather conditions and iron rain.


RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Depiction of extreme weather conditions on exoplanet
2. How the extreme weather causes iron rain
3. How the exoplanet orbits its star
4. Depiction of iron rain on exoplanet

VOICEOVER (in English):

"Scientists have found evidence of molten iron rain driven by extreme heat on an exoplanet 640 lightyears from Earth"

"Exoplanet WASP-76b is found in the Gemini constellation where its close orbit to a star causes extreme temperatures on one side of the planet, while the other side is cooler."

"According to Physics World, the conditions are hot enough to break down molecules into atoms on the side exposed to the star. On the darker side these can recombine into molecules."

"The exoplanet orbits the star differently to how Earth orbits the Sun. Earth rotates as it circles the sun. The exoplanet does not.

"The Guardian reports that, similar to Earth's moon, the exoplanet is "tidally locked".

"This means that only one side of the planet is continually exposed to the star, while the other is locked in darkness."

"It's these conditions that are believed to create the exoplanet's extreme weather conditions and iron rain."


SOURCES: PHYSICS WORLD, NATURE, GUARDIAN
https://physicsworld.com/a/iron-rain-on-exoplanet-is-driven-by-huge-extremes-in-temperature/
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-2107-1.epdf?referrer_access_token=56ktVHef7TroJ1_LjHBMlNRgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0NYq1mnfS3gXQsKbxGmaZ59X7YPltXqnt97Uzw1n-RRTlSrEXcSK8L0EOVZSanIzY02IQtI3B5WgJ1xhOfhlA0oQgR0gmsenhpyUIdlTqgeeVKTrxHQA78eDyNNCh8pKOyRDIMj4Ba-OjO1zA7e0GA6oz2i4IPT2MhHOkmaP45Rk8sz4Q2P21_DCu-ZFU6Jl85mEqVPrE_jm4wVlKBDbXHIxeu04rXTFBahwCkze6fqwfVadDo2ogJXnmLDrtandJs%3D&tracking_referrer=physicsworld.com
https://www.theguardian.com/science/2020/mar/11/scientists-identify-rain-of-molten-iron-on-distant-exoplanet