5G wireless networks could interfere with weather forecasts

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5G wireless networks could interfere with technology that uses satellites to make accurate weather forecasts.

Weather satellites predict the weather by observing the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere, according to a new study published in the journal Nature.

However, meteorologists are worried as 5G networks use wireless radio frequencies that could interfere with data collection.

This is because water vapor is measured at the 23.8 gigahertz frequency, which is when it gives off a faint signal in the atmosphere.

According to a 2010 report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, losing access to the 23.8-gigahertz signal would cause 30 percent of data that contributes to weather forecasts to be eliminated.

The network transmits at nearly the same frequency as weather satellites and could produce a signal that looks like that of water vapor, according to the study.

This could result in inaccurate weather forecasts.

The US government has already begun auctioning sections off 5G wireless frequencies to companies, with the most recent one being between 24.25 and 24.45 gigahertz and another one being between 24.75 and 25.25 gigahertz.

According to the study, the next 5G auction will take place later this year in December.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. 5G wireless network and weather satellite in space
2. 5G network radio frequencies
3. Water vapor, a frequency bar and a pie chart
4. 5G wireless network, weather satellite, water vapor representation and weather forecast

VOICEOVER (in English):
"5G wireless networks could interfere with technology that uses satellites to make accurate weather forecasts."

"According to a new study published in the journal Nature, weather satellites are used to predict the weather by observing the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere."

"However, meteorologists are worried as 5G networks use wireless radio frequencies that could interfere with data collection."

"This is because water vapor is measured at the 23.8 gigahertz frequency, which is when it gives off a faint signal in the atmosphere."

"According to a 2010 report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, losing access to the 23.8-gigahertz signal would cause 30 percent of data that contributes to global weather forecasts to be eliminated."

"According to the study, the network transmits at nearly the same frequency as weather satellites and could produce a signal that looks like that of water vapor."

"This could result in inaccurate weather forecasts."

SOURCES: Nature,
https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01305-4