Astronomers find youngest known magnetar

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RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN
Astronomers at NASA and the ESA have discovered a neutron star that is the youngest known magnetar ever recorded.

Swift J1818.0−1607 was born in a supernova that would have been visible from Earth 240 years ago.

A magnetar is a kind of highly magnetized neutron star, the most powerful magnetic objects in the universe. Only 30 magnetars in the Milky Way have been found.

The star is located 16,000 light-years away from Earth in the constellation Sagittarius and is 16,240 years old.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Supernova that birthed the magnetar Swift J1818.0−1607 visible from Earth 240 years ago
2. Depiction of a supernova
3. Depiction of a magnetar
3. Location of the Solar System and Swift J1818.0−1607 in the Milky Way
4. Size and mass of Swift J1818.0−1607 compared to Sun and Manhattan
5. Swift J1818.0−1607 is a radio pulsar

VOICEOVER (in English):
"Astronomers at NASA and the ESA have discovered a neutron star called Swift J1818.0−1607. The star was born in a supernova that would have been visible from Earth 240 years ago."

"A supernova occurs when a star runs out of nuclear fuel and can no longer support itself against the inward pull of gravity."

"Not only is it a neutron star, but it's a rare kind of neutron star known as a magnetar, the most powerful magnetic objects in the universe."

"This magnetar is located 16,000 light-years away from Earth in the constellation Sagittarius. Since its supernova was visible 240 years ago, the star is 16,240 years old."

"As a neutron star, it packs twice the mass of the Sun into a body just 25 kilometers, or 15 miles, in diameter."

"A magnetar is a kind of spinning neutron star known as a pulsar."

"According to NASA, a pulsar is a neutron star that emits beams of radiation that sweep through Earth's line of sight."

"The 'pulses' of high-energy radiation we see from a pulsar are due to a misalignment of the neutron star's rotation axis and its magnetic axis."


SOURCES: Science Magazine, The Astrophysical Journal Letters, ESA, NASA
https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/06/galactic-flash-points-long-sought-source-enigmatic-radio-bursts
https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/2041-8213/ab9742
http://www.esa.int/ESA_Multimedia/Images/2020/06/XMM-Newton_observes_baby_magnetar
https://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/science/objects/pulsars2.html.old