Automakers fail to fully protect connected cars from hacking

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Automakers have done little to address a cyber security loophole made prevalent by ever more common wireless connections featured in new vehicles, according to a report prepared by U.S. Senator Ed Markey.

The senator’s staff reached out to 16 automakers and inquired about their cyber security policies. However, only two of the responding companies said they could react “in real time” to a potential security issue.

Nearly all new vehicles come with wireless communication technologies. Drivers and passengers can connect their smartphones to on-board WiFi and some rear-view mirrors allow drivers and passengers to connect their smartphones through bluetooth. GPS navigation has also become a feature drivers increasingly rely on.

Taking advantage of security vulnerabilities, hackers can gain access to stored driving data, posing a risk to the privacy of drivers.

Cybercriminals can even take control of a driving vehicle by, for example, activating its horn or tampering with the readings on its speedometer or oil gauge.

In worst-case scenarios, drivers can even lose control of their vehicle’s braking system.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Wifi connection between vehicle and driver’s smartphone
2. Driver using bluetooth in vehicle
3. Driver using GPS
4. Hacker gaining access to driving data
5. Hacker controlling the car honk and the steering wheel
6. Driver failing to brake

VOICEOVER (in English):


“Automakers have done little to address a cyber security loophole made prevalent by ever more common wireless connections featured in new vehicles. Drivers and passengers can connect their smartphones to on-board WiFi...”

“...while some rear-view mirrors allow occupants to connect their smartphones through bluetooth technologies.”

“GPS navigation has also become a feature drivers increasingly rely on.”

“Taking advantage of security vulnerabilities, hackers can gain access to stored driving data, posing a risk to the privacy of drivers.”

“Cybercriminals can even take control of a driving vehicle by, for example, activating its horn or tampering with the readings on its speedometer or oil gauge.”

“In worst-case scenarios, drivers can even lose control of their vehicle’s braking system.”

SOURCES: Forbes, AFP, Reuters
http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2013/07/24/hackers-reveal-nasty-new-car-attacks-with-me-behind-the-wheel-video/
https://www.yahoo.com/tech/s/hackers-most-connected-cars-194046953.html
http://www.reuters.com/article/2015/02/09/autos-cybersecurity-idUSL1N0VJ11T20150209