California-based startup to hurl rockets into space with mechanical centrifuge

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A U.S. aerospace company is building a huge centrifuge to launch spacecraft into orbit.

Wired.com reports that the SpinLaunch's centrifuge, or the kinetic launch system, has an internal vacuum chamber with a diameter of 100 meters.

The SpinLaunch rocket is about the size of an SUV and the vehicle's design will allow it to carry a satellite payload of about 200 pounds.

The centrifuge's electric motor will spin the tethered rocket for an hour to build up speed.

Once the rocket is ratcheted up to a speed of over 5,000 miles per hour, the release mechanism will cut the vehicle loose and let it fly through the 35 degree launch tunnel.

When the vehicle reaches the edge of the stratosphere, the rocket's internal propulsion will fire and push the spacecraft through the final stretch to space.

Citing SpinLaunch, Wired reports that the centrifuge could launch up to five small satellites a day and reduce launch costs by a factor of almost 20.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. The centrifuge launch system and dimensions of the internal vacuum chamber
2. Size of the rocket and its payload
3. The centrifuge spin the rocket for one hour to reach a speed of 5,000 miles per hour
4. Advantages of mechanical centrifuge in rate of launch and cost reduction

VOICEOVER (in English):
"A U.S. aerospace company is building a huge centrifuge to launch spacecraft into orbit."

"Wired.com reports that the SpinLaunch's centrifuge, or the kinetic launch system, has an internal vacuum chamber with a diameter of 100 meters."

"The SpinLaunch rocket is about the size of an SUV and the vehicle's design will allow it to carry a satellite payload of about 200 pounds."

"The centrifuge's electric motor will spin the tethered rocket for an hour to build up speed."

"Once the rocket is ratcheted up to a speed of over 5,000 miles per hour, the release mechanism will cut the vehicle loose and let it fly through the 35 degree launch tunnel."

"When the vehicle reaches the edge of the stratosphere, the rocket's internal propulsion will fire and push the spacecraft through the final stretch to space."

"Citing SpinLaunch, Wired reports that the centrifuge could launch up to five small satellites a day and reduce launch costs by a factor of almost 20."

SOURCES: WIRED https://www.wired.com/story/inside-spinlaunch-the-space-industrys-best-kept-secret/