China is 'spying on Americans via Carribean networks'

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The security specialist has been analyzing sensitive signals data for years and says China appears to have used mobile phone networks in the Caribbean to surveil US mobile phone subscribers as part of its espionage campaign against Americans.

He says that China uses one of its state-controlled phone operators to direct signalling messages to US subscribers, usually while they are travelling abroad.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. American tourist sends text message after landing in Barbados. We see how networks handles the message.
2. Nearby tower receives message, transmit to other towers.
3. Message moves into planet's underwater cable system.
4. Cable system delivers message to China. We see big spy farm where Chinese spies see tourist's selfie, reads texts.
5. We see same tourist take selfie. Same sequence of data transmission via towers.
6. This time the data is hacked by Chinese spies inside Barbados, via local networks.

VOICEOVER (in English):
The Guardian newspaper revealed that China has likely been spying on US citizens via Caribbean phone networks for years.

The paper based its article on research by Gary Miller, a former mobile network security executive.

Miller has been analyzing sensitive signals data for years and says China appears to have used mobile phone networks in the Caribbean to surveil US mobile phone subscribers as part of its espionage campaign against Americans.

He says that China uses one of its state-controlled phone operators to direct signalling messages to US subscribers, usually while they are travelling abroad.

Signalling messages are commands that are sent by telecoms operators across the global network. They allow operators to locate mobile phones and connect users to one another.

But some signalling messages can be used for tracking, monitoring, or intercepting communications.

Miller said that China has lately favoured more targeted espionage and are likely using Caribbean networks as proxies to conduct its attacks, having close ties with these countries in both trade and technology investment.

SOURCES: The Guardian, IB Times, oodaloop.com
https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2020/dec/15/revealed-china-suspected-of-spying-on-americans-via-caribbean-phone-networks
https://www.ibtimes.sg/china-allegedly-spying-americans-through-caribbean-phone-networks-report-54202
https://www.oodaloop.com/briefs/2020/12/15/china-suspected-of-spying-on-americans-via-caribbean-phone-networks/