China's Tiangong-1 space station set to re enter Earth

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RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN
An out-of-control space station is set to fall to Earth within a few weeks, but experts say the likelihood of it hitting anyone in the process is very slim.

The Guardian reports that China's Tiangong-1 space station has been orbiting uncontrolled since 2016, and has sped up its descent towards Earth in recent months.

According to the European Space Agency, reentry is estimated to occur between March 29 and April 9, with the impact point anywhere between 43 degrees north and 43 degrees south latitudes.

The 9.4-ton space station is expected to burn up as it enters the atmosphere, and may be visible from Earth as a bright streak in the sky.

Experts say a small amount of debris may survive reentry and fall to Earth, but the probability of it hitting anyone and causing harm is extremely low.

To date, only one person has ever been struck by falling space debris, but wasn't injured, according to a report from the Aerospace Corporation.


RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Depiction of Tiangong-1 space station's uncontrolled descent toward Earth
2. Estimated date and location of reentry
3. Tiangong-1 burning up during reentry
4. Depiction of pieces of debris falling to Earth


VOICEOVER (in English):

"China's Tiangong-1 space station has been orbiting uncontrolled since 2016, and has sped up its descent towards Earth in recent months."

"Reentry is estimated to occur between March 29 and April 9, with the impact point anywhere between 43 degrees north and 43 degrees south latitudes."

"The 9.4-ton space station is expected to burn up as it enters the atmosphere, and may be visible from Earth as a bright streak in the sky."

"Experts say a small amount of debris may survive reentry and fall to Earth, but the probability of it hitting anyone and causing harm is extremely low."


SOURCES:
European Space Agency, Aerospace
http://blogs.esa.int/rocketscience/2018/01/16/tiangong-1-frequently-asked-questions-2/
http://www.aerospace.org/cords/reentry-predictions/tiangong-1-reentry/