China to censor smoking, bikinis on the internet

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RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN
Content moderators in China have been tasked with the job of censoring unsuitable content such as smoking, tattoos and bikinis, the South China Morning Post reports.

Popular live-streaming app Inke uses 1,200 staff members to selectively remove questionable content. The moderators have 15 seconds before a video goes live to decide whether a two-piece bathing suit is indecent or if it acceptable to show on screen depending on its context.

The most censored activity on the platform is smoking, according to the South China Morning Post. The activity isn't allowed to be shown as it promotes an unhealthy lifestyle.

Excessive tattoos on the body will also be blurred online, The New York Times reports.

The team uses a training manual which is published by the China Association of Performing Arts to decide what is deemed as questionable content.

Zhi Heng, the head of Inke's content safety team told The South China Morning Post that they "cannot let past anything that is against the law and regulations, against mainstream values and against the company's values".

China is increasingly tightening control of content online to promote what it refers to as "core socialist values," according to the New York Times.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Content moderator and unsuitable content
2. Inke icon, Computer screen, bikini being censored
3. Cigarette being blurred
4. Blurring a tattoo

VOICEOVER (in English):
"The South China Morning Post reports content moderators in China have been tasked with the job of censoring unsuitable content.

"This includes smoking, tattoos and items of clothing such as bikinis."

"Popular live-streaming app Inke uses 1,200 staff members to selectively remove questionable content."

"The moderators have 15 seconds before a video goes live to decide whether a two-piece bathing suit is indecent or if it acceptable to show on screen depending on its context."

"According to the South China Morning Post, the most censored activity on the platform is smoking. The activity isn't allowed to be shown as it promotes an unhealthy lifestyle."

"The New York Times reports excessive tattoos on the body will also be blurred online."

SOURCES: South China Morning Post, The New York Times,
https://www.scmp.com/tech/policy/article/3005252/no-smoking-no-tattoos-or-bikinis-inside-chinas-war-clean-internet
https://www.scmp.com/video/scmp-originals/3004485/inside-chinese-internet-censorship-centre
https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/27/business/china-war-on-fun-earrings-tattoos.html