Cities that could run out of water like Cape Town

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As global fresh water supplies become scarce, several major cities across the world could run out of drinking water like Cape Town.

Only three percent of Earth's water is suitable for drinking.

According to U.N. estimates, global demand for fresh water will exceed supply by 40 percent in 2030, due to climate change, human action and population growth, the BBC reported.
Several major cities around the world may also face drinking water shortages in the future.

So Paulo experienced a drinking water crisis in 2015 when its main reservoir fell below four percent capacity, and also had reservoir issues in January 2017.

Bangalore's growing property market and tech industry have outpaced the city's ability to manage water and sewage systems. The city's water pipes also lose half its drinking water to waste.

Beijing will increasingly struggle to meet its water needs. Figures from 2015, showed 40 percent of the city's surface water was so polluted it was not even suitable for agriculture or industrial use.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Global supplies of fresh water decreasing
2. Sao Paulo has had reservoir issues
3. Bangalore water issues
4. Beijing surface water issues

VOICEOVER (in English):
"As global fresh water supplies become scarce, several major cities across the world could run out of drinking water like Cape Town."

"So Paulo experienced a drinking water crisis in 2015 when its main reservoir fell below four percent capacity, and also had reservoir issues in January 2017."

"Bangalore's growing property market and tech industry have outpaced the city's ability to manage water and sewage systems. The city's water pipes also lose half its drinking water to waste."

"Beijing will increasingly struggle to meet its water needs in the future. Figures from 2015, showed 40 percent of the city's surface water was so polluted, it was not even suitable for agriculture or industrial use."

SOURCES: BBC
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-42982959