Coronavirus pandemic could last up to two years

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A report by the University of Minnesota's Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy published last Thursday predicts that the coronavirus pandemic could last from 18 to 24 months.

Experts who participated in the study believe the pandemic will not stop until around 60 to 70 percent of the population becomes immune to the virus.

The coronavirus's longer incubation period and high R0, or reproduction number, make it a highly contagious virus. According to a study published in Emerging Infectious Diseases, COVID-19's R0 is a median of 5.7, meaning an infected individual can spread the virus to five to six people.

The study suggests all authorities should prepare for the worst-case scenario or scenario 2, which according to their study is one where the first wave of the spread is followed by a larger wave in the fall or winter of this year.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Spread of coronavirus
2. Two-thirds of population infected and then immunized to the coronavirus
3. R0 number of coronavirus
4. People using facemasks to prevent spread of virus

VOICEOVER (in English):
"A report by the University of Minnesota's Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy published last Thursday predicts that the coronavirus pandemic could last from 18 to 24 months."

"Experts who participated in the study believe the pandemic will not stop until around 60 to 70 percent of the population becomes immune to the virus."

"The coronavirus's longer incubation period and high R0, or reproduction number, make it a highly contagious virus. According to a study published in Emerging Infectious Diseases, COVID-19's R0 is a median of 5.7, meaning an infected individual can spread the virus to five to six people."

"The study suggests all authorities should prepare for the worst-case scenario or scenario 2, which according to their study is one where the first wave of the spread is followed by a larger wave in the fall or winter of this year."

SOURCES:
Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy, Emerging Infectious Diseases
https://www.cidrap.umn.edu/sites/default/files/public/downloads/cidrap-covid19-viewpoint-part1_0.pdf
https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/eid/article/26/7/20-0282_article