Coronavirus threatens U.S. meat supply

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The spread of coronavirus among employees in meat factories is forcing several meat production plants in the U.S. to shut down.

A report by the Associated Press explains that efforts from the meat industry in the United States to curtail the spread of the virus among their employees have resulted in slower meat production which will eventually result in less meat in the market and higher prices for the meat that is available.

Pork production has been the most affected. According to the report, 15 of America's largest pork-packaging plants are responsible for 60 percent of all processed pork produced in the U.S.

This means that when one shuts down, overall pork production is severely affected. As of last week, pork processing capacity has dropped 25 percent.

The Associated Press reports the U.S. Department of Agriculture expects beef to rise in price by between one to two percent, poultry by 1.5 percent and pork between two and three percent.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Fewer employees working on-site due to the coronavirus
2. Pig industry most harshly affected
3. Meats will see a slight increase in prices

VOICEOVER (in English):

"A report by the Associated Press explains that efforts from the meat industry in the United States to curtail the spread of the virus among their employees have resulted in slower meat production which will eventually result in less meat in the market and higher prices for the meat that is available."

"Pork production has been the most affected. According to the report, 15 of America's largest pork-packaging plants are responsible for 60 percent of all processed pork produced in the U.S."

"This means that when one shuts down, overall pork production is severely affected. As of last week, pork processing capacity has dropped 25 percent."

"The Associated Press reports the U.S. Department of Agriculture expects beef to rise in price by between one to two percent, poultry by 1.5 percent and pork between two and three percent."

SOURCES:
Associated Press
https://apnews.com/cb9fd324e9e3276dd56075a78223b7bb