Denmark to convert excess renewable energy into hydrogen fuel

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Denmark's biggest energy firm is planning on building wind farms that will convert their energy surplus into gas.

According to The Scientific American, Orsted, Denmark's largest power company, announced it is planning to convert electricity from its wind farms into hydrogen fuel.

They plan to achieve this by using electricity from wind farms to power electrolysis plants. These are capable of splitting water into oxygen and hydrogen that can be used as energy.

The resulting hydrogen would be stored in a natural gas distribution system and used when there's a shortage of wind and sunlight powering the wind farms.

Currently, there are 45 projects in Europe working on making power-to-gas conversion technologies more efficient and affordable.

According to a study published in February in the journal Nature Energy, the cost of splitting water has lowered by 40 percent, suggesting the technology could become more accessible in the near future.

According to Dutch energy consultancy, Navigant, using gas storage networks to support the European power system could help European consumers save up to $156 billion.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Wind farms in Denmark
2. Electrolysis plants splitting water into oxygen and hydrogen atoms
3. Hydrogen stored in natural gas distribution system
4. Europe developing power-to-gas conversion technologies; cost of splitting water has lowered by 40 percent

VOICEOVER (in English):

According to The Scientific American, Orsted, Denmark's largest power company, announced it is planning to convert electricity from its wind farms into hydrogen fuel.

They plan to achieve this by using electricity from wind farms to power electrolysis plants. These are capable of splitting water into oxygen and hydrogen that can be used as energy.

The resulting hydrogen would be stored in a natural gas distribution system and used when there's a shortage of wind and sunlight powering the wind farms.

Currently, there are 45 projects in Europe working on making power-to-gas conversion technologies more efficient and affordable.

According to a study published in February in the journal Nature Energy, the cost of splitting water has lowered by 40 percent, suggesting the technology could become more accessible in the near future.

SOURCES:
Scientific American
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/europe-stores-electricity-in-gas-pipes/