Dental floss could be linked to toxic chemicals, study finds

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Certain types of dental floss may increase the amount of toxic chemicals present in the body, according to a new study published in the Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology.

Researchers in the study, led by the Silent Spring Institute in collaboration with the Public Health Institute in Berkeley, California, tested for the presence of PFAS in six different dental flosses.

To do this, the researchers examined the blood samples of 178 middle-aged female participants.

The study found that women who flossed using Oral-B Glide had higher levels of PFAS, or polyfluoroalkyl substances, present in the body than women who used other brands of floss.

In a statement to USA Today, Oral-B said they didn't find the toxic chemical in their floss and said their dental floss "undergoes thorough safety testing."

The company added: "The safety of the people who use our products is our top priority."

PFAS are typically found in food packaging, cleaning products and drinking water, according to the EPA.

This is the first study to link dental floss to PFAS, according to the study.

PFAS could build up over time and may cause health problems. PFAS has previously been linked to thyroid disease, high cholesterol and decreased fertility, according to the EPA.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Dental floss and a male medical body
2. Dental floss, PFAS and a test tube with a blood sample
3. Oral-B Glide, PFAS and a measurement bar
4. Where PFAS is typically found

VOICEOVER (in English):
"Certain types of dental floss may increase the amount of toxic chemicals present in the body, according to a new study published in the Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology."
"The researchers tested for the presence of PFAS in six different dental flosses."
"To do this, the researchers examined the blood samples of 178 middle-aged female participants."
"The study found that women who flossed using Oral-B Glide had higher levels of PFAS, or polyfluoroalkyl substances, present in the body than women who used other brands of floss."
"According to the EPA, PFAS are typically found in food packaging, cleaning products and drinking water."
"This is the first study to link dental floss to PFAS."
SOURCES: Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology, EPA, USA Today, Silent Spring Institute
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41370-018-0109-y
https://www.epa.gov/pfas/basic-information-pfas
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2019/01/09/oral-b-glide-floss-toxic-pfas-chemicals-study/2530661002/
https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2019-01/ssi-dfa010819.php