Dubai plans to build sky transportation system

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Dubai's Roads & Transport Authority has announced it is working in collaboration with British company Beemcar to construct a driverless cable-car network that would operate above the city streets.

According to CNN, each electric pod would have four individual seats. The pods are set to travel at 50 kilometers per hour and stand at 7.5 meters above the city streets, supported by carbon composite beams.

According to Beemcar, the electric pod system would be able to transport roughly 20,000 passengers per hour along routes that are designed to cover the busiest areas of the city.

Beemcar isn't the first foreign company to collaborate with Dubai in developing aerial transportation systems. American SkyTran and Belarusian company Skyway are also collaborating with the city's transportation authorities.

These collaborations are part of the city's effort to reach its goal of making 25 percent of its urban transportation driverless by 2030.



RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Dubai's collaboration with Beemcar to develop sky transportation system.
2. Infrastructure of the sky pods
3. Sky pods transporting several individuals and riding through the city.
4. Showing different skypods around the city.

VOICEOVER (in English):

SOURCES:
"Dubai's Roads & Transport Authority has announced it is working in collaboration with British company Beemcar to construct a driverless cable-car network that would operate above the city streets."

"According to CNN, each electric pod would have four individual seats. The pods are set to travel at 50 kilometers per hour and stand at 7.5 meters above the city streets, supported by carbon composite beams."

"According to Beemcar, the electric pod system would be able to transport roughly 20,000 passengers per hour along routes that are designed to cover the busiest areas of the city."