Explainer: How hurricanes, typhoons and cyclones form

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Hurricanes are severe low-pressure weather systems that form in tropical waters over the open ocean.

Hurricanes are the most violent storms on Earth. In other parts of the world, they may instead be referred to as typhoons or cyclones. The scientific term for these storms is "tropical cyclone."

Tropical cyclones that form over the north Atlantic Ocean and northeastern Pacific Ocean are called hurricanes. In the Pacific Ocean west of the International Dateline they are called typhoons. Cyclones are formed over the South Pacific and Indian Ocean.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Depiction of the tropics and Equator
2. Top-down view of a hurricane
3. Where hurricanes, typhoons and cyclone form
4. Warm air rising from the ocean where it meets cool air
5. Heated vapor rising up to form a low-pressure cyclone
6. Warm air climbing up to feed the newly formed cyclone
7. Heat exchange creates a wind that spirals up around the eye of the storm
8. Water vapor from the ocean fuels the storm
9. Top-down view of a hurricane

VOICEOVER (in English):

"Hurricanes are severe low-pressure weather systems that form in tropical waters over the open ocean."

"Hurricanes are the most violent storms on Earth. In other parts of the world, they may instead be referred to as typhoons or cyclones. The scientific term for these storms is 'tropical cyclone.'"

"Tropical cyclones that form over the north Atlantic Ocean and northeastern Pacific Ocean are called 'hurricanes.' In the Pacific Ocean west of the International Dateline they are called typhoons. Cyclones are formed over the South Pacific and Indian Ocean."

"Tropical cyclones form when warm humid air rises from the ocean, hitting cold air. Convergent winds force the warm air into the atmosphere, where it releases heat as it condenses into clouds and rain."

"The exchange of the heat from the surface creates a pattern of wind that spirals up around the eye of the storm."

"Water vapor from the ocean continues to fuel the storm."

"The tropical cyclones's high winds create a massive mound of water along the front of the eye that causes storm surges as the hurricane moves over the ocean."

"A tropical storm is classified as a tropical cyclone when its maximum sustained wind speeds top 64 knots. That's the equivalent of 74 miles per hour, or 118 kilometers per hour."

SOURCES: NASA, NOAA, National Geographic, Live Science
https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hurricanes/main/index.html
https://oceanservice.noaa.gov/facts/cyclone.html
https://www.nationalgeographic.org/article/hurricanes-cyclones-and-typhoons-explained/
http://www.livescience.com/32180-how-do-cyclones-hurricanes-and-typhoons-differ.html