Explainer: How the CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing tool works

For story suggestions or custom animation requests, contact [email protected] Visit http://archive.nextanimationstudio.com to view News Direct's complete archive of 3D news animations.

RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN
The 2020 Nobel Prize in chemistry was awarded to two women who developed CRISPR/Cas9, a tool that allows scientists to cut parts of the genome like a pair of molecular scissors.

Emmanuelle Charpentier, 51, and Jennifer A. Doudna, 56, were awarded the Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday, Oct. 7, becoming only the sixth and seventh women ever to win a Nobel Prize in chemistry and the first all-female team to win the award, according to Science Magazine.

Charpentier is the Founding, Scientific and Managing Director of the Max Planck Unit for the Science of Pathogens, Berlin. Doudna is a professor of molecular and cell biology at the University of California, Berkeley.

This animation explains how the CRISPR/Cas9 method for gene editing works.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. DNA inside a cell's nucleus
2. CRISPR/Cas9 system is made up of a DNA-cutting enzyme, Cas9, and a guide RNA
3. The guide RNA guides the enzyme to a specific sequence in the genome that is to be cut
4. The guide RNA binds to the targeted sequence of DNA and the Cas9 enzyme makes a cut across both strands of the double helix
5. The cell attempts to repair the damaged sequence, introducing a mutation or other changes to the genome

VOICEOVER (in English):
"The 2020 Nobel Prize in chemistry was awarded to two women who developed CRISPR/Cas9, a tool that allows scientists to cut parts of the genome like a pair of molecular scissors."

"The CRISPR/Cas9 system is made up of a DNA-cutting enzyme, called Cas9, and a guide RNA."

"The guide RNA leads the enzyme to a specific sequence in the genome that is to be cut."

"The guide RNA binds to the targeted sequence of DNA, and the Cas9 enzyme makes a precise cut across both strands of the double helix."

"The cell recognizes and attempts to repair the damaged sequence, but this can introduce a mutation, thus tricking the cell into disabling a gene."

"The cell can also be prompted to remake the targeted sequence using an edited portion of DNA as a template."

SOURCES: The Nobel Prize, Science Magazine, The Harvard Gazette
https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/chemistry/2020/press-release/
https://www.nobelprize.org/prizes/chemistry/2020/advanced-information/
https://www.sciencemag.org/news/2020/10/crispr-revolutionary-genetic-scissors-honored-chemistry-nobel
https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2019/10/new-crispr-genome-editing-system-can-target-disease-causing-genetic-variations/