Explainer: What is La Nina?

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RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN
COLLEGE PARK, MARYLAND — The U.S. Climate Prediction Center said on Thursday, September 11 that the weather pattern known as La Nina had officially formed.

La Nina is a complex ocean-atmosphere phenomenon that occurs every few years in the Pacific Ocean. La Nina brings dry, warm weather to the Southwestern U.S. It brings cool, wet weather to an area reaching from the Pacific Northwest and southeastern Alaska to the Northern Plains and central Canada.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. La Nina threatens stronger wildfires and more powerful hurricanes
2. La Nina brings dry, warm weather to the Southwestern U.S. and cool, wet weather to the Pacific Northwest, southeastern Alaska, the Northern Plains and western and central Canada
3. Normal conditions in the Pacific Ocean
4. La Nina conditions in the Pacific Ocean
5. La Nina can bring more rain to Australia and Indonesia and lead to more lightning and stronger tropical storms in other parts of the world

VOICEOVER (in English):

"The extreme weather that has seen record-breaking wildfires in California and the strongest hurricane to hit Louisiana in 160 years looks set to get worse."

"On Thursday, September 11, the U.S. Climate Prediction Center said the weather pattern known as La Nina had officially formed."

"La Nina brings dry, warm weather to the Southwestern U.S. It brings cool, wet weather to an area reaching from the Pacific Northwest and southeastern Alaska to the Northern Plains and central Canada."

"La Nina — which means 'little girl' in Spanish — is a complex ocean-atmosphere phenomenon that occurs every few years in the Pacific Ocean."

"Under normal conditions, winds in the Pacific Ocean push warm water from the west coast of South America toward Indonesia. As the warm water moves westward, cold water rises."

"When La Nina occurs, winds in the Pacific grow much stronger. They push even more warm water toward Indonesia, causing more cold water to rise near the west coast of South America."

"This could worsen the drought in the Southwestern U.S. this winter, while bringing a cooler, wetter winter to other parts of North America."

"These changes in sea surface temperature are felt around the planet. La Nina can lead to more rain in Australia and Indonesia, stronger hurricanes and typhoons, and more lightning in some parts of the world."

SOURCES: Reuters, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, News.com.au, Taipei Times, Fire, Weather & Avalanche Center, NASA Lightning Team, NASA Earth Observatory
https://www.reuters.com/article/weather-lanina/la-nia-conditions-present-75-chance-through-2020-winter-us-forecaster-idUSAQN032RMG
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/10/climate/la-nina-southwest-drought.html
https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2020-07-23/noaas-la-nina-watch-could-signal-a-dry-winter-for-los-angeles
https://www.news.com.au/technology/environment/california-fires-satellite-photos-show-blaze-has-covered-western-usa/news-story/0fc4b858d02f766d0e7639c448e3a764
https://www.taipeitimes.com/News/front/archives/2020/07/01/2003739152
https://www.fireweatheravalanche.org/fire/
https://geology.com/articles/lightning-map.shtml
https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/86268/longer-more-frequent-fire-seasons