Genetic link may exist between endometriosis and depression

For story suggestions or custom animation requests, contact [email protected] Visit http://archive.nextanimationstudio.com to view News Direct's complete archive of 3D news animations.

RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN
New research led by geneticists from the Queensland University of Technology in Australia has found that depression and endometriosis often coincide, along with a variety of gastrointestinal conditions.

The researchers compared data from genetic databases looking for shared genetic risk factors for depression and endometriosis — and found 20 independent locations on the genome that were significant to both conditions, eight of which are new.

Endometriosis can cause severe cramping, painful menstruation, urination, and intercourse. In some cases, it can lead to infertility. The condition has no known cure, but patients can seek treatment to help ease their symptoms, which are usually treated with painkillers, hormone therapy, or surgery.

While studies indicate the condition affects roughly one in 10 women, people with endometriosis go an average of six-and-a-half years before they get a diagnosis, according to Endometriosis Australia.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Comorbidity of endometriosis, depression and gastrointestinal conditions
2. View of a cell, its nucleus and DNA
3. Inside lining of the uterus normally thickens and sheds each month
4. With endometriosis, the lining grows outside of the uterus
5. Adhesions can form in the pelvic area, chocolate cysts can form in the ovaries
6. Endometriosis causes pain, usually treated with painkillers, hormone pills, or surgery

VOICEOVER (in English):

"New research led by geneticists from the Queensland University of Technology in Australia has found that depression and endometriosis often coincide, along with a variety of gastrointestinal conditions."

"The researchers compared data from genetic databases looking for shared genetic risk factors for depression and endometriosis — and found 20 independent locations on the genome that were significant to both conditions, eight of which are new."

"While studies indicate the condition affects roughly one in 10 women, people with endometriosis go an average of six-and-a-half years before they get a diagnosis, according to Endometriosis Australia."

"The mucus that lines the inside of the uterus, called the endometrium, normally thickens and sheds in accordance with a woman's monthly cycle."

"But for those with endometriosis, the lining grows outside the uterus. It still thickens and sheds, but cannot exit the body, leading to irritation and inflammation."

"Adhesions can often form in the pelvic area, and blood-filled chocolate cysts sometimes develop in the ovaries."

"The condition has no known cure, but patients can seek treatment to help ease their symptoms."

"Endometriosis can cause severe pain, and is usually treated with painkillers, hormone therapy, or surgery."

SOURCES: Science Alert, Human Genetics, Current Obstetrics and Gynecology Reports, New England Journal of Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Endometriosis Australia
https://www.sciencealert.com/endometriosis-may-be-genetically-linked-to-both-depression-and-gut-problems
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00439-020-02223-6
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32959083/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5737931/
http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1614814?query=featured_home&
ations-in-common-non-cancerous-gynecological-disorder
http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/endometriosis/home/ovc-20236421
https://www.endometriosisaustralia.org/research