Geologists link Taiwan's earthquakes to tropical storms: study

For story suggestions or custom animation requests, contact [email protected] Visit http://archive.nextanimationstudio.com to view News Direct's complete archive of 3D news animations.

RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN
Typhoons that routinely hit Taiwan may increase or exacerbate earthquakes across the island, according to a new study.
Writing in Scientific Reports, the German Research Centre for Geosciences states that Taiwan is known to experience frequent earthquakes because it lays astride the Philippine Sea and the Asian continental plates.

According to the researchers, 2009's Typhoon Morakot was one of the worst typhoons in Taiwan's history. The storm caused landslides and moved huge loads of material into the island's rivers.

Morakot removed significant quantities of debris on top of Taiwan's active mountain ranges and pushed rock units against one another. As the rocks crack, the breakage leads to shallow earthquakes that the team detected in the 2.5 years after the storm.

In a news release, the researchers say their study is the first proof that massive erosion from storms may trigger seismic activity, which is the reverse of what usually happens.


RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Storms may have triggered seismic activities in Taiwan
2. Typhoon Morakot caused landslides that deposited materials in rivers
3. Materials adds to tectonic stress on fault lines
4. Earthquakes result when rock units break

VOICEOVER (in English):
Taiwan is known to experience frequent earthquakes because it lays astride the Philippine Sea and the Asian continental plates. However, according to a new study by the German Research Centre for Geosciences, the typhoons that routinely hit Taiwan may increase or exacerbate earthquakes across the island."

"According to the paper in Scientific Reports, 2009's Typhoon Morakot was one of the worst typhoons in Taiwan's history. The storm caused landslides and moved huge loads of material into the island's rivers."

"According to the study, Morakot dumped loads of debris on top of Taiwan's active mountain ranges and pushed rock units against one another. As the rocks crack, the breakage leads to shallow earthquakes that the team detected in the 2.5 years after the storm."

"In a news release, the researchers say their study is the first proof that massive erosion from storms may trigger seismic activity, which is the reverse of what usually happens."


SOURCES: Nature: Scientific Reports, GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-67865-y
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/07/200702113658.htm