Greenland's meltwater increasing rate of sea level rise

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According to a paper published in the journal Nature, researchers extracted ice core data in order to examine rates of surface melt and run-off in Greenland.

Ice cores are long tubes of ice and snow samples drilled from an ice-sheet or glacier. Each layer contains key climate information including changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, and climate stability.

The data examined goes back 339 years. The first signs of meltwater date back to the mid-1800s, coinciding with the beginning of the industrial revolution."

Data from the research revealed Greenland's ice sheets are melting more quickly than they ever have in the last 350 years.

According to data from the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, meltwater from Greenland contributes to roughly 20 percent of the world's sea-level rise.

If all the ice in Greenland melted, sea levels would rise by seven meters.


RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Representation of Greenland
2. Depiction of scientists extracting ice cores
3. Portrayal of data found in ice cores
4. Representation of Greenland ice sheets melting and sea level rising

VOICEOVER (in English):
"According to a paper published in the journal Nature, researchers extracted ice core data in order to examine rates of surface melt and run-off in Greenland."

"Ice cores are long tubes of ice and snow samples drilled from an ice-sheet or glacier. Each layer contains key climate information including changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, and climate stability."

"The data examined goes back 339 years. The first signs of meltwater date back to the mid-1800s, coinciding with the beginning of the industrial revolution."

"Data from the research revealed Greenland's ice sheets are melting more quickly than they ever have in the last 350 years."

"According to data from the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, meltwater from Greenland contributes to roughly 20 percent of the world's sea-level rise."

"If all the ice in Greenland melted, sea levels would rise by seven meters."

SOURCES:
Nature, UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0752-4
https://www.ipcc.ch/