Heavy metals found scattered throughout our solar system

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Precious elements such as gold, uranium, and platinum are found in our solar system due to a clash that took place between two neutron stars 4.6 billion years ago, according to a new study published in the journal Nature.

When two neutron stars clash together, powerful gravitational waves are formed, creating enough energy for these heavy metals to be forged.

Scientists tested out this theory by analyzing the isotopic decay of ancient meteorites that had fallen to Earth. This was then compared to a numerical simulation of our solar system.

The researchers believe that the collision occurred around 100 million years before Earth was formed.

This celestial phenomenon is said to have enriched our planet with up to 0.3 percent of its heaviest elements present today, according to a University of Florida news release.

Imre Bartos, a researcher involved with the study, said he believes that the study could provide an insight into the origin and composition of our solar system.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Heavy metals found in the solar system
2. Two neutron stars clashing
3. Ancient meteorite being analyzed and the numerical simulation of the solar system
4. Earth and a pie chart

VOICEOVER (in English):
"According to a new study published in the journal Nature, precious elements such as gold, uranium, and platinum are found in our solar system due to a clash that took place between two neutron stars 4.6 billion years ago."

"When two neutron stars clash together, powerful gravitational waves are formed, creating enough energy for these heavy metals to be forged."

"Scientists tested out this theory by analyzing the isotopic decay of ancient meteorites that had fallen to Earth."

"This was then compared to a numerical simulation of our solar system."

"According to a University of Florida news release, this celestial phenomenon is said to have enriched our planet with up to 0.3 percent of its heaviest elements present today."

SOURCES: New Atlas, Nature, University of Florida
https://newatlas.com/neutron-star-collision-heavy-elements/59542/
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-019-1113-7
https://news.ufl.edu/2019/04/neutron-star-merger-explains-actinide-abundance-/