How flu vaccines work

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The flu has arrived early in North America, as officials worry this season's outbreak could be severe.

According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the percentage of patients reporting flu-like symptoms reached the 2.2 percent threshold by late November, indicating flu season had begun, USA Today reported.

Experts believe the U.S. could be hit hard by the H3N2 strain, the same strain behind Australia's especially bad flu season.

The flu vaccine has been shown to be 10 percent against H3N2, according to a research paper in Eurosurveillance.

Flu vaccines cause antibodies to develop in the body around two weeks after vaccination, according the the CDC.

These antibodies then help the body fight against virus infections that are in the vaccine.
The seasonal flu vaccine is designed to protect against influenza viruses researchers predict will be the most common during the upcoming season, the CDC reported.
RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Woman with flu symptoms talking to doctor
2. Experts believe the H3N2 strain could be prevalent this year
3. Flu shots cause the body to develop antibodies in about two weeks
4. Antibodies attacking a virus

VOICEOVER (in English):
"According to the CDC, the percentage of patients reporting flu-like symptoms reached the 2.2 percent threshold by late November, indicating flu season has begun."

"Experts believe the U.S. could be hit hard by the H3N2 strain this year, which the flu vaccine was found to be only 10 percent effective against."

"Flu vaccinations cause the body to develop antibodies in about two weeks. These antibodies then help fight against viruses in the vaccine."

"The seasonal flu vaccine is designed to protect against influenza strains researchers predict will be the most common during the upcoming season."

SOURCES: USA Today, CDC
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2017/12/05/flu-season-has-arrived-and-could-bad-one/925193001/
https://www.cdc.gov/flu/protect/keyfacts.htm