How "Kissing bugs" can carry parasite that causes Chagas disease

For story suggestions or custom animation requests, contact [email protected] Visit http://archive.nextanimationstudio.com to view News Direct's complete archive of 3D news animations.

RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN
Triatomines, often called kissing bugs, are insects that suck blood and bite the faces of people, while they are asleep, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention.

Some of these kissing bugs carry a parasite known as Trypanosoma cruzi. This is a parasite that could potentially cause Chagas disease. However, not all triatomine bugs carry the parasite.

If the parasite is present, it will be in the insects' feces. The parasite is able to enter the skin of a person that is bitten if the insect's feces has accidentally been rubbed into the person's bite wound or into a mucous membrane such as the eyes or the mouth."

Initial symptoms of Chagas disease include fever, body aches, headaches and rashes. According to the CDC, the disease may result in cardiac complications or intestinal complications for some. Anti-trypanosomal medication can be used to treat Chagas disease.

In order to prevent the spread of the disease, the CDC recommends sealing gaps and cracks around windows and walls as well as repairing any holes and tears on screen doors.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. What kissing bugs are
2. Parasites that kissing bugs could be carrying
3. How the parasites could enter the human body
4. Symptoms of Chagas disease
5. Medication to treat the disease
6. How to prevent the spread of the disease

VOICEOVER (in English):
"According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, triatomines, often called kissing bugs, are insects that suck blood and bite the faces of people, while they are asleep."

"Some of these kissing bugs carry a parasite known as Trypanosoma cruzi."

"This is a parasite that could potentially cause Chagas disease."

"However, not all triatomine bugs carry the parasite."

"If the parasite is present, it will be in the insects' feces."

"The parasite is able to enter the skin of a person that is bitten if the insect's feces has accidentally been rubbed into the person's bite wound or into a mucous membrane such as the eyes or the mouth."

"Initial symptoms of Chagas disease include fever, body aches, headaches and rashes."

"Anti-trypanosomal medication can be used to treat Chagas disease."

"In order to prevent the spread of the disease, the CDC recommends sealing gaps and cracks around windows and walls as well as repairing any holes and tears on screen doors."

SOURCES: USA Today, CNN, CDC, The Washington Post,
https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/health/2019/04/25/kissing-bugs-chagas-disease-what-know-blood-sucking-bug/3571479002/
https://edition.cnn.com/2019/04/25/health/kissing-bug-delaware-case-cdc-study-trnd/index.html
https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/68/wr/mm6815a5.htm
https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/chagas/gen_info/vectors/index.html
https://www.cdc.gov/dpdx/trypanosomiasisamerican/index.html
https://www.cdc.gov/parasites/chagas/gen_info/detailed.html
https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2019/04/25/bloodsucking-kissing-bug-bit-girl-delaware-deadly-bugs-are-march/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.0c8fcc0421aa