How to view a solar eclipse in a safe way

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Ahead of next week's total eclipse across South America, astronomers from the American Astronomical Society are warning the public that staring directly at an eclipse can cause permanent damage to the eyes.

The American Astronomical Society's website says eclipse glasses or handheld solar filters that compliant with ISO 12312-2 international safety standards must be used when looking at a partially eclipsed sun.

This is because the concentrated solar rays from the sun are strong enough to cause significant damage to the retina and could even lead to blindness.

Unfiltered cameras, telescopes or regular sunglasses must be not be used when viewing an eclipse. Old solar filters must be discarded if they are scratched, punctured, torn or damaged in any way.

The solar filter can only be removed when the moon has completely covered the sun in a total eclipse.

Alternate viewing methods include viewing the eclipse via a pinhole projection. This is when you cut a pinhole onto a piece of paper or cardboard and use it to project light onto another piece of paper to view the eclipse.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. A partial eclipse, the impact of an eclipse on one's eyes, eclipse glasses and one handheld solar filter
2. Inset of the sun and the eyes becoming damaged
3. Unfiltered cameras, telescopes, sunglasses and old solar filters
4. Total solar eclipse
5. Pinhole projection to view the eclipse
6. How a total solar eclipse occurs
7. Where next week's total solar eclipse will be able to be viewed

VOICEOVER (in English):
"Ahead of next week's total eclipse across South America, astronomers from the American Astronomical Society are warning the public that staring directly at an eclipse can cause permanent damage to the eyes."

"The American Astronomical Society's website says eclipse glasses or handheld solar filters that compliant with ISO 12312-2 international safety standards must be used when looking at a partially eclipsed sun."

"This is because the concentrated solar rays from the sun are strong enough to cause significant damage to the retina and could even lead to blindness."

"Unfiltered cameras, telescopes or regular sunglasses must be not be used when viewing an eclipse."

"Old solar filters must be discarded if they are scratched, punctured, torn or damaged in any way."

"The solar filter can only be removed when the moon has completely covered the sun in a total eclipse."

"Alternate viewing methods include viewing the eclipse via a pinhole projection."

"This is when you cut a pinhole onto a piece of paper or cardboard and use it to project light onto another piece of paper to view the eclipse."

"A total solar eclipse occurs when the moon covers part of the sun facing earth."

"Space.com reports next week's solar eclipse will start at the east-northeast of Wellington, New Zealand and make its way across the Southern Pacific Ocean."

"The eclipse will appear over central Chile and is expected to last for 2 minutes and 36 seconds. It will continue east-southeast through to central Argentina and Uruguay."

"Its path will be 11,000 kilometers in width."

SOURCES: Space.com, NASA, American Astronomical Society,
https://www.space.com/solar-eclipse-glasses-reuse-safety.html
https://www.space.com/one-week-until-total-solar-eclipse-2019.html
https://www.space.com/35555-total-solar-eclipse-safety-tips.html
https://www.nasa.gov/content/eye-safety-during-a-total-solar-eclipse
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/2017/the-moon-is-front-and-center-during-a-total-solar-eclipse
https://eclipse.aas.org/eye-safety/eyewear-viewers
https://eclipse.aas.org/eye-safety/safe-viewing