Local fish species in U.K. waters predicted to decline by 2050

For story suggestions or custom animation requests, contact [email protected] Visit http://archive.nextanimationstudio.com to view News Direct's complete archive of 3D news animations.

RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN
A new report by the Marine Climate Change Impacts Partnership has predicted that cold-water fish species in British waters may be replaced with warm-water species as sea temperatures continue to rise in the next 30 years.

Researchers explained that local fish such as cod may decline and be replaced with fish that are typically found in warmer waters, such as the European anchovy.

The study also pointed out that the number of Atlantic bluefin tuna has been increasing in British waters, and that this may be partially related to rising temperatures.

Likewise, warming waters has caused mackerel to become the dominant fish off of Scotland's west coast over the past 30 years, while the Northern hake has repopulated in the northern part of the North Sea after being largely absent for more than 50 years.

The study also predicts that fish may evolve to have smaller bodies as oxygen levels decrease in the warming waters, and fish have to swim farther to find food.

Researchers involved in the study explained that this could be bad news for the British fishing industry, which could face a limited quota allocation, and may have to make their livelihood with tinier fish.

They projected the net value of the British fishing industry to decrease by 10 percent by 2050 under a "high-emissions scenario."

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. How British waters could change if the sea temperatures continue to rise
2. Local fish may decline and be replaced with fish typically found in water waters
3. How warming waters have changed waters off Scotland and the North Sea
4. Fish may evolve to have smaller bodies

VOICEOVER (in English):
"A new report by the Marine Climate Change Impacts Partnership has predicted that cold-water fish species in British waters may be replaced with warm-water fish species as sea temperatures continue to rise in the next 30 years."

"Researchers explained that local fish such as cod may decline and be replaced with fish that are typically found in warmer waters, such as the European anchovy."

"The study also pointed out that the number of Atlantic bluefin tuna has been increasing in British waters, and that this may be partially related to rising temperatures."

"Likewise, warming waters has caused mackerel to become the dominant fish off of Scotland's west coast over the past 30 years, while the Northern hake has repopulated in the northern part of the North Sea after being largely absent for more than 50 years."

"The study also predicts that fish may evolve to have smaller bodies as oxygen levels decrease in the warming waters, and fish have to swim farther to find food."

SOURCES: The Telegraph, Herald Scotland, Marine Climate Change Impacts Partnership
https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2020/01/14/climate-change-could-see-uk-seas-filled-hake-anchovies-herring/
https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/18163333.tuna-replace-cod-2050-due-warmer-scottish-seas/
http://www.mccip.org.uk/impacts-report-cards/full-report-cards/2020/
http://www.mccip.org.uk/media/1999/mccip-report-card-2020_webversion.pdf