Microplastic particles found in Lake Tahoe

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New research has uncovered microplastic particles from the depths of Lake Tahoe.

Scientists from the Desert Research Institute collected water samples from Lake Tahoe and found microplastic particles in them for the first time. Synthetic fiber and bits of red and blue plastic were found in the lake's waters, according to the Los Angeles Times.

Researchers used pumps, funnels, tubing and filters to collect water samples from six different locations across Lake Tahoe.

Once the plastic particles were gathered in the water filters, the scientists oxidized organic matters such as insects, twigs and algae. They then used a high-density liquid separation method to separate the sediments from the microplastics.

According to the Reno Gazette Journal, the team is now in the process of examining the microplastics and identifying the different types of plastics and where they came from.

The research team will present its findings to the American Geophysical Union in December.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Water sample from Lake Tahoe containing microplastics
2. How the researchers collected the water samples
3. Microplastics being separated from the sediments
4. Microplastics being examined

VOICEOVER (in English):
"Scientists from the Desert Research Institute collected water samples from Lake Tahoe and found microplastic particles in them for the first time."

"According to the Los Angeles Times, synthetic fiber and bits of red and blue plastic were found in the lake's waters."

"Researchers used pumps, funnels, tubing and filters to collect water samples from six different locations across Lake Tahoe."

"Once the plastic particles were gathered in the water filters, the scientists oxidized organic matters such as insects, twigs and algae."

"They then used a high-density liquid separation method to separate the sediments from the microplastics."

"According to the Reno Gazette Journal, the team is now in the process of examining the microplastics and identifying the different types of plastics and where they came from."

SOURCES: LA Times, Reno Gazette Journal, https://www.latimes.com/environment/story/2019-08-26/lake-tahoe-microplastic-pollution-detected
https://www.rgj.com/story/news/2019/08/22/microplastics-found-scientists-desert-research-institute-nevada/2080122001/