Migrating sea turtles find empty U.S. beaches, a rare chance to thrive

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Thousands of sea turtles are currently migrating to nesting grounds on beaches across the southeastern United States, just in time to enjoy a rare break from human interference as coronavirus lockdowns keep people indoors.

Experts interviewed by CBS News expect sea turtles to thrive amid the lack of human activity and pollution as beaches are deserted thanks to stay-at-home orders.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Sea turtle swimming in the ocean
2. Beaches void of crowds and debris see increase in sea turtle nests
3. Number of species of sea turtles, changes hatchling will live to adulthood
4. Animals and human threats to sea turtles

VOICEOVER (in English):
"Thousands of sea turtles are currently migrating to nesting grounds on beaches across the southeastern United States, just in time to enjoy a rare break from human interference as coronavirus lockdowns keep people indoors."

"Experts interviewed by CBS News expect sea turtles to thrive amid the lack of human activity and pollution as beaches are deserted thanks to stay-at-home orders. CBS cited a University of Florida study conducted in 2016 which found that removing detritus from the beach can increase the number of nests by as much as 200 percent."

"There are seven existing species of sea turtles. Nearly all are endangered, three of them critically. Out of every 1,000 hatchlings, only one survives to adulthood, CBS Miami reports, citing the Loggerhead Marinelife Center in Juno Beach Florida."

"Sea turtle hatchlings are preyed on by dogs, seabirds, raccoons, crabs and fish, while adult sea turtles face numerous threats from humans, including microplastics, fishing gear, human development along the ocean, boat strikes, global warming, and trade in sea turtle shells and sea turtle eggs."

SOURCES: CBS News, Miami Herald, University of Florida, WWF
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/sea-turtles-are-finally-thriving-now-that-people-are-stuck-indoors-2020-04-18/
https://www.miamiherald.com/news/coronavirus/article242134506.html
https://news.ufl.edu/articles/2016/05/study-proves-removing-beach-debris-increases-sea-turtle-nests.html
https://www.worldwildlife.org/species/sea-turtle
https://wwf.panda.org/knowledge_hub/endangered_species/marine_turtles/asian_marine_turtles/our_solutions/turtle_trade/