Molecule could determine dementia type

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Scientists have identified single tau protein molecules that could help identify what form of dementia may develop in a person's brain.

The molecule has a specific structural shape, according to the study published in the journal eLife.

Researchers from the University of Texas isolated single tau protein molecules from the human brain to test if it resulted in different shapes. They found that molecules with specific structures turned toxic.

The scientists also plan to develop a test using either blood or spinal fluid. This test will detect these molecules and identify what they could potentially turn into. This could help identify what kind of dementia a patient has before symptoms begin to show.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Male medical body and a tau protein molecule
2. A single tau protein molecule
3. A human brain and single tau protein molecules on a petri dish
4. A single tau protein molecule structure turning toxic

VOICEOVER (in English):
"Scientists at UT Southwestern have identified single tau protein molecules that could help identify what form of dementia may develop in a person's brain."

"According to the study published in the journal eLife, the molecule has a specific structural shape."

"The researchers isolated single tau protein molecules from the human brain to test if it resulted in different shapes."

"They found that molecules with specific structures turned toxic."

SOURCES: New Atlas, News Medical Life Sciences, Science Daily, e Life journal, UT Southwestern Medical Center,
https://newatlas.com/tau-molecule-diagnose-dementia-alzheimers/57617/
https://www.news-medical.net/news/20181211/Single-tau-molecule-holds-clues-to-help-diagnose-neurodegeneration-in-its-earliest-stages.aspx
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/12/181211122433.htm
https://elifesciences.org/articles/37813
https://www.utsouthwestern.edu/newsroom/articles/year-2018/forecasting-dementia.html