New water treatment method is based on a sea creature

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Researchers have taken inspiration from a sea creature to create a new kind of water treatment.

According to the study published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, coagulation is a chemical water treatment process that causes colloidal and suspended water-borne particles to group into formations and settle.

Conventional coagulants like aluminum sulfate remove large particles but cannot capture smaller dissolved contaminants.

Researchers from Yale and Peking University have sought to address this issue.
They modeled a nanocoagulant after the sea anemone Actinia to remove a broad range of contaminants in a single step.

Like the Actinia, the nanocoagulant's core-shell structure turns inside out in water. The shell traps larger particles while the exposed core captures smaller, dissolved ones.


RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. How water coagulation process works
2. Conventional coagulants remove only large particles
3. Nanocoagulant modelled after sea anemone
4. How actinia-like nanocoagulant works

VOICEOVER (in English):

"Coagulation is a chemical water treatment process that causes colloidal and suspended particles in water to group into formations and settle."

"But while conventional coagulants like aluminum sulfate remove large particles, they are unable to capture smaller dissolved contaminants."

"Researchers from Yale and Peking University sought to address this."

"They modeled a nanocoagulant after the sea anemone Actinia to remove a broad range of contaminants in a single step."

"Like the Actinia, the nanocoagulant's core-shell structure turns inside out in water.

"The shell traps larger particles while the exposed core captures smaller, dissolved ones."

SOURCES:
Nature Nanotechnology, Nature, Yale University
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41565-018-0307-8
https://sustainabilitycommunity.nature.com/users/194517-jinwei-liu/posts/41419-single-step-water-treatment-with-a-multi-functional-biomimetic-nanocoagulant
https://seas.yale.edu/news-events/news/water-treatment-breakthrough-inspired-sea-creature