Night owls risk earlier death, claims study

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New research suggests people who go to bed late were shown to have a 10 percent higher mortality rate than early risers.

The study, published in Chronobiology International, observed 433,628 individuals for a 6-and-half-year period. Fifty-thousand late bedders of those sampled were more likely to die or suffer from diseases and mental health issues.

This, co-lead author Kristin Knutson explained, may be due to stress, lack of exercise, alcohol, drug abuse or other unhealthy behaviors. Knutson suggests night owls could try to get to bed early more regularly and be exposed to light early in the morning.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Depiction of man going to bed late
2. Depiction of health issues
3. Depiction of man waking up early

VOICEOVER (in English):

"New research suggests people who go to bed late were shown to have a 10 percent higher mortality rate than early risers."

"The study, published in Chronobiology International, observed 433,628 individuals for a 6-and-half-year period."

"Fifty-thousand late bedders of those sampled were more likely to die or suffer diseases and mental health issues."

"This, co-lead author Professor Kristin Knutson explained, may be due to stress, lack of exercise, alcohol, drug abuse or other unhealthy behaviors."

"Knutson suggests night owls could try to get to bed early more regularly and get exposed to light early in the morning."

SOURCES: Chronobiology International, Science Daily
https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/07420528.2018.1454458
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180412085736.htm