Oceanic sharks and rays have declined by over 70 percent

For story suggestions or custom animation requests, contact [email protected]w. Visit http://archive.nextanimationstudio.com to view News Direct's complete archive of 3D news animations.

RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN
Scientists say more than 70 percent of the world's sharks and rays disappeared from the ocean between 1970 and 2018, in large part due to overfishing — and more than three quarters of shark species are now threatened with extinction.

According to a study published in the journal Nature, there are 31 species of oceanic sharks and rays. Of these, three are critically endangered and 13 are endangered. Eight are listed as vulnerable and three as near threatened. Only six are classified as of least concern.

The study in Nature attributes the declines to decades of overfishing, notably longline fishing. Longlines can stretch to 100 km and catch fish and other wildlife indiscriminately.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. More than 70 percent decline in oceanic shark and ray population
2. Conservation status of 31 oceanic shark and ray species
3. Three species are critically endangered
4. 13 species are endangered
5. Great whites have recovered due to science-based fishing
6. Shark caught in a longline fishery

VOICEOVER (in English):
"Scientists say more than 70 percent of the world's sharks and rays disappeared from the ocean between 1970 and 2018, in large part due to overfishing — and more than three quarters of shark species are now threatened with extinction."

"According to a study published in the journal Nature, there are 31 species of oceanic sharks and rays. Of these, three are critically endangered and 13 are endangered. Eight are listed as vulnerable and one as near threatened. Only six are classified as of least concern."

"The three critically endangered species are the oceanic whitetip shark, the scalloped hammerhead and the great hammerhead. Their populations have declined by more than 80 percent."

"Among the 13 endanged species are the pelagic thresher, dusky shark, the shortfin mako and the longfin mako."

"However, citing Shark Advocates International, BBC News reports that a couple of species, including the great white, are beginning to recover due to science-based catch limits."

"The study in Nature attributes the declines to decades of overfishing, notably longline fishing. Longlines can stretch to 100 km and catch fish and other wildlife indiscriminately."

"There has been a twofold increase in the use of longlines over the past half century. This fishing technique now snares three times as many sharks."

SOURCES: Nature, Smithsonian, BBC News, Global Shark Movement Project
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-020-03173-9
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/oceanic-sharks-and-rays-have-declined-70-1970-180976890/
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-55830732
https://www.globalsharkmovement.org/global-shark-hotspots-at-risk-from-industrial-longline-fishing/
https://ca.audubon.org/news/albatrosses-killed-longline-fishing-gear