Remains of female warriors found in Mongolia

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Archeologists from California State University, Los Angeles, told Live Science that they found the remains of two women warriors while excavating a cemetery at the Airagiin Gozgor archaeological site in Orkhon, Mongolia.

Specialists examined remains found in 29 burial sites. These include human remains from 16 men, 10 women, and three unidentified individuals. Researchers were looking for evidence of the effects of horseback riding, archery, and trauma on the body.

Christine Lee from California State University, Los Angeles, lead researcher on the yet-to-be-published study, said the remains of the two warriors showed signs that both practiced horseback riding and archery, just like the remains of the men and male adolescents.

The two women are believed to have been 20 and 50 years old and lived during the Xianbei period, which lasted from 147 to 552 AD. This period was marked by political turmoil. Lee and fellow researcher Yahaira Gonzalez said it is likely they practiced archery and horseback riding because they may have been needed to fight alongside the men.

The research has yet to be published in a peer-reviewed journal. It was meant to be presented at the American Association of Physical Anthropologists annual conference in mid-April. However, the conference was canceled to the coronavirus pandemic.


RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Location of excavation site in Mongolia
2. Types of remains found in archaeological site
3. Two warrior women found in site
4. Two warrior women riding on horseback and shooting arrows

VOICEOVER (in English):

"Archeologists from California State University, Los Angeles, told Live Science that they found the remains of two women warriors while excavating a cemetery at the Airagiin Gozgor archaeological site in Orkhon, Mongolia."

"Specialists examined remains found in 29 burial sites. These include human remains from 16 men, 10 women, and three unidentified individuals. Researchers were looking for evidence of the effects of horseback riding, archery, and trauma on the body."

"Christine Lee from California State University, Los Angeles, lead researcher on the yet-to-be-published study, said the remains of the two warriors showed signs that both practiced horseback riding and archery, just like the remains of the men and male adolescents."

"The two women are believed to have been 20 and 50 years old and lived during the Xianbei period, which lasted from 147 to 552 AD. This period was marked by political turmoil. Lee and fellow researcher Yahaira Gonzalez said it is likely they practiced archery and horseback riding because they may have been needed to fight alongside the men."

SOURCES:
LiveScience
https://www.livescience.com/mongolia-warrior-women-mulan.html