Research in mice suggests production of brown fat could help battle obesity

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Researchers at the University of Cambridge believe a molecule present in rats could help fight obesity in humans.

Humans have two types of fat, white and brown. White fat stores energy and acts as a thermal insulator. However, excessive amounts could lead to diabetes, heart disease and certain types of cancer. Brown fat, on the other hand, burns calories to generate heat.

Scientists from the University of Cambridge detected a molecule in mice called BMP8b. This protein controls the activation of brown fat in the brain and body tissue of mice.

According to their study published in the journal Nature, they analyzed mice that had been bred to produce higher levels of the molecule in fat tissue.

Researchers discovered that increased levels of the protein caused white fat to become beige — or turn brown —burning more calories and generating more energy as a result.

They concluded that it could be possible to create a drug that alters fat function in humans just as the BMP8b protein does in mice.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Depiction of types of fat and their function in humans
2. Depiction of BMP8b protein in mice
3. Representation of white fat cells in mice turning into beige fat cells
4. Portrayal of possible drug with similar effect of BMP8b protein for humans

VOICEOVER (in English):
"Humans have two types of fat, white and brown. White fat stores energy and acts as a thermal insulator. However, excessive amounts could lead to diabetes, heart disease and certain types of cancer. Brown fat, on the other hand, burns calories to generate heat."

"Scientists from the University of Cambridge detected a molecule in mice called BMP8b. This protein controls the activation of brown fat in the brain and body tissue of mice."

"According to their study published in the journal Nature, they analyzed mice that had been bred to produce higher levels of the molecule in fat tissue.

"Researchers discovered that increased levels of the protein caused white fat to become beige — or turn brown —burning more calories and generating more energy as a result."

"They concluded that it could be possible to create a drug that alters fat function in humans just as the BMP8b protein does in mice."

SOURCES: Nature
https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-018-07453-x#search-menu