Researchers develop new method aimed at curing Alzheimer's

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Scientists have found a way to target toxic particles that destroys healthy brain cells and leads to illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study published in the journal PNAS.

Alzheimer's disease causes the brain to shrink dramatically over time, which leads to memory loss, personality changes along with other symptoms.

Researchers have identified the toxic particles, small clumps of protein known as oligomers, as the most likely cause of dementia.

Proteins in the brain are usually responsible for vital cell processes, however when they form clumps and start to build up, they start killing healthy nerve cells instead.

Researchers involved developed small molecules which would target oligomers and work to slow down the formation of these toxic particles.

The study claims their method was the first to directly target the toxic oligomers.

Alzheimer's disease affects millions of people worldwide and the team hopes the study would lead to the development of new drugs to treat the disease in a few years.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. The brain is shown shrinking.
2. Oligomers are shown forming into clumps.
3. The toxic clump are now shown going towards healthy nerve cells.
4. Small molecules are shown targeting the toxic clump.

VOICEOVER (in English):
"Alzheimer's disease causes the brain to shrink dramatically over time, which leads to memory loss, personality changes along with other symptoms."

"Researchers have identified the toxic particles, small clumps of protein known as oligomers, as the most likely cause of dementia."

"Proteins in the brain are usually responsible for vital cell processes, however when they form clumps they start killing healthy nerve cells instead."

"Researchers involved developed small molecules which would target oligomers and work to slow down the formation of these toxic particles."

SOURCES: KXLY, University of Cambridge, Medical Xpress, Newsweek, Proceedings of the National Academy of Science of the United States of America
https://www.kxly.com/news/breakthrough-research-puts-scientists-closer-to-alzheimer-s-cure/799429005

https://www.cam.ac.uk/research/news/scientists-reveal-plan-to-target-the-cause-of-alzheimers-disease

https://medicalxpress.com/news/2018-09-scientists-reveal-ground-breaking-alzheimer-disease.html

https://www.newsweek.com/alzheimers-disease-drugs-targeting-toxic-dementia-causing-particles-could-be-1135812

http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2018/09/25/1807884115