Researchers find 29 human footprints in Canada

Humans may have been stomping around Canada as early as 13,000 years ago — and they left footprints.

According to a study published in the journal PLOS-ONE, researchers discovered an ancient human footprint along the coast of Canada’s Calvert Island in 2014, before then uncovering 28 more in subsequent excavations.

The well-preserved prints are believed to have been made by two barefoot adults and one child some 13,000 years ago.

The foot impressions were left on light brown clay, which was filled in and preserved by sand, thick gravel, and another layer of clay.

The findings lend support to the theory that ancient humans travelled from Asia to North America near the end of the last ice age by following a route along the Pacific coastline.

Fossilized tracks are themselves rare, but these particular ones have also earned the distinction of being the oldest known human footprints found in North America.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Twenty-nine ancient human footprints discovered on Calvert Island, Canada
2. Footprints believed to belong to two adults and one child
3. Footprints possibly covered and preserved by sand, thick gravel, clay
4. Theory of ancient humans going from Asia to North America

VOICEOVER (in English):

“Researchers discovered an ancient human footprint along the coast of Canada’s Calvert Island in 2014, before then uncovering 28 more in subsequent excavations.”

“The well-preserved prints are believed to have been made by two barefoot adults and one child some 13,000 years ago.”

“The foot impressions were left on light brown clay, which was filled in and preserved by sand, thick gravel, and another layer of clay.”

“The findings lend support to the theory that ancient humans travelled from Asia to North America near the end of the last ice age by following a route along the Pacific coastline.”


SOURCES:
PLOS-ONE, New York Times
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0193522
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/28/science/footprints-oldest-north-america.html