Researchers find key to slowing aging process in mice

For story suggestions or custom animation requests, contact [email protected] Visit http://archive.nextanimationstudio.com to view News Direct's complete archive of 3D news animations.

RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN
Researchers have discovered a natural product that can reduce the level of damaged cells in mice caused by aging.

Scientists have found that aged mice treated with Fisetin, found in many fruits and vegetables, has significant positive effects on health and lifespan, according to a University of Minnesota Medical School press release.

As people get older, they accumulate damaged cells. As these cells reach a certain level of damage they go through a process known as cellular senescence, whereby they stop dividing.

Younger people with healthier immune systems can clear out these damaged cells, but as people age, these cells aren't cleared as effectively.
These damaged cells then begin to accumulate and cause low-level inflammation and release enzymes that degrade tissue.

Researchers found that Fisetin reduced the level of damaged cells in older mice, and published their findings in the journal EBioMedicine.
According to one of the study's authors Paul D. Robbins, "these results suggest that we can extend the period of health, termed healthspan, even towards the end of life."
Further research will need to be carried out to see if these results can be reproduced in humans.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Aged mice treated with Fisetin
2. Young man with healthy cell and older man with damaged cells
3. Damaged cells accumulating in older man
4. Fisetin reducing level of damaged cells in mice

VOICEOVER (in English):
"According to a University of Minnesota Medical School press release, scientists have found that aged mice treated with Fisetin, found in many fruits and vegetables, has significant positive effects on health and lifespan."

"As people age, they accumulate damaged cells. As these cells reach a certain level of damage they go through cellular senescence, whereby they stop dividing. Older people can't clear these damaged cells out as effectively."

"These damaged cells then begin to accumulate and cause low-level inflammation and release enzymes that degrade tissue."

"Researchers found that Fisetin reduced the level of damaged cells in older mice, and published their findings in the journal EBioMedicine."
SOURCES: University of Minnesota Medical School, WCCO
https://www.med.umn.edu/news-events/university-minnesota-medical-school-researchers-have-discovered-how-slow-aging
https://www.myndnow.com/news/bismarck-news/researchers-find-key-to-slowing-the-agingprocess/1492915117