Researchers to probe undersea 'blue hole' off Florida: report

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An international team will explore the depths of a massive undersea cavern called the Green Banana off the coast of Florida. According to the Charlotte Observer, the year-long expedition will be overseen by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The cavern is a blue hole, meaning it is an oceanic equivalent to a sinkhole on land. Estimated to be 425 feet deep, the blue hole is expected to be too narrow in many places for drone submarines to navigate. This means divers must investigate the cave system.

Writing in a news release, the agency says blue holes could be thriving habitats for oceanic wildlife in otherwise barren regions of the sea. Creatures that could dwell in blue holes include sea turtles, corals, sponges and sharks.


RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. NOAA-led team will explore the Green Banana blue hole off Florida
2. Green Banana's speculated depth and environment
3. Blue holes could be thriving habitats for marine life

VOICEOVER (in English):
"An international team will explore the depths of a massive undersea cavern called the Green Banana off the coast of Florida. According to the Charlotte Observer, the year-long expedition will be overseen by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration."

"The cavern is a blue hole, meaning it is an oceanic equivalent to a sinkhole on land. Estimated to be 425 feet deep, the blue hole is expected to be too narrow in many places for drone submarines to navigate. This means divers must investigate the cave system."

"Writing in a news release, the agency says blue holes could be thriving habitats for oceanic wildlife in otherwise barren regions of the sea. Creatures that could dwell in blue holes include sea turtles, corals, sponges and sharks."


SOURCES: Charlotte Observer, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
https://www.charlotteobserver.com/news/nation-world/national/article244345437.html
https://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/explorations/20blue-holes/welcome.html