Science kills Dyatlov Pass conspiracy theories

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In January 1959, in the middle of the Russian winter, nine students set off on a long ski hike into Siberia and never returned.

When rescue teams later found their bodies strewn about the snow of Dyatlov Pass, their horrific injuries became the seeds of many a conspiracy theory, ranging from an alien attack to a Russian missile strike aimed at killing double agents.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Show students dressed in 1959 ski-hiking clothes ski-hiking into driving wind and snow.
2. Show students struggling in cold conditions, rough mountainous terrain
3. Continued struggling in rough conditions.
4. Hikers digging in to create shelter in snow.
5. Show diagram of tent in shelter, showing cuts in the layers of snow. Snow building up.
6. Avalanche slides, students crawl out, feeling cold in driving winds and snow.


VOICEOVER (in English):
In January 1959, in the middle of the Russian winter, nine students set off on a long ski hike into Siberia and never returned.

When rescue teams later found their bodies strewn about the snow of Dyatlov Pass, their horrific injuries became the seeds of many a conspiracy theory, ranging from an alien attack to a Russian missile strike aimed at killing double agents.

National Geographic reports that a new scientific study found evidence that the nine unlucky students were killed by hypothermia after being crushed by a very unique type of avalanche.

The study postulates that the group sealed their own fate when they cut a shelter into a slope under the shoulder of a hillside.

The last photo of the group showed them cutting the shelter.

Computer models showed that such a position could have become deadly, as katabatic winds coming down the hillside would have deposited a heavy load of hard snow on the slope above them.

Their cut would also have made breaks in the supporting underlying layers of snow, causing a small section of hard snow above them to eventually break off, causing terrible injuries and forcing them to leave the tent in haste.


SOURCES: National Geographic, Wired, The Moscow Times
https://www.nationalgeographic.com/science/2021/01/has-science-solved-history-greatest-adventure-mystery-dyatlov/
https://www.wired.com/story/dyatlov-pass-incident-slab-avalanche/
https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2021/01/28/study-sheds-new-light-on-russias-dyatlov-pass-mountain-mystery-a72771