Scientists find Arabian artifacts in rocky Viking cave boat

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Items from as far away as Iraq and Turkey were found in a stone boat inside a volcanic lava cave in Iceland.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Show Iceland, Turkey, Iraq on globe map, animated red arrows from latter to former, zoom to cave in Iceland
2. Massive volcanic eruption, vikings arriving and colonizing Iceland
3. Vikings filled with fear, falling on knees as massive volcano erupts
4. Enter cave's entrance, building boat-like structure from stone, burning animal bones 5. 5. Bone sacrifice, god Surtr floats in Icelandic night sky, battling unseen enemies
6. God Freyr floats in sky, smoke from sacrificial fires feeding him, battling Surtr


VOICEOVER (in English):
Archaeologists were surprised to find artifacts from as far away as Iraq and Turkey while digging in an ancient Viking site in Iceland.

Located in the Surtshellir cave, the ancient site is located in a lava pipe of a volcano that erupted almost 1,100 years ago.

At the time of that eruption, the Vikings had recently colonized Iceland.

In a study published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, researchers theorize that the effects of this cataclysmic eruption must have been deeply unsettling for the Vikings.

They say that, after the lava cooled, the Vikings entered the cave and constructed a boat-shaped structure out of rocks.

Within this structure, the Vikings burned animal bones at high temperatures as a sacrifice.

This may have been done to appease Surtr, a giant who Vikings believed would kill the last of the gods in the battle of Ragnarök and then engulf the world in flames.

Another possibility is that the burnt offerings were meant to strengthen Freyr, a Viking fertility god, in the hopes that he could defeat Surtr and stop the fiery end of the world.


SOURCES: Archaeology.org, Live Science, Science Direct
https://www.archaeology.org/news/9661-210427-viking-boat-cave
https://www.livescience.com/viking-boat-structure-ragnarok.html
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0305440320302363