Scientists propose building artificial walls to save Antarctic glaciers from collapsing

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Scientists have proposed a plan to build a wall around the Antarctic ice sheets in a bid to slow their collapse.

As the planet heats up due to global warming, the world's ice sheets are rapidly melting and causing sea levels to rise at an alarming rate.

To prevent this global catastrophe, scientists proposed constructing artificial undersea mounds to catch the ice as it flows forward, thereby allowing it to reground, according to new research published in The Cryosphere.

A second idea aims to address the threat of warm water currents, which have been known to thin ice shelves.

According to the research, building a long, continuous wall or sill across the front of the glacier will block warm water from seeping under the ice shelf.

The study authors found that smaller structures would have a 30% success rate, and that larger walls may be even more effective.

However, some scientists warn that such geoengineering is simply a band-aid for the real problem, and offers no real solution to reversing global warming.


RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Depiction of melting ice sheets contributing to sea level rise
2. Depiction of mounds of dirt regrounding collapsing ice sheets
3. Depiction of warm water thinning glaciers
4. Depiction of long continuous wall blocking warm water currents

VOICEOVER (in English):

"As the planet heats up due to global warming, the world's ice sheets are rapidly melting and causing sea levels to rise at an alarming rate."

"To prevent this global catastrophe, scientists proposed constructing artificial undersea mounds to catch the ice as it flows forward, thereby allowing it to reground."

"A second idea aims to address the threat of warm water currents, which have been known to thin ice shelves."

"According to the research, building a long, continuous wall or sill across the front of the glacier will block warm water from seeping under the ice shelf."


SOURCES:
The Cryosphere
https://www.the-cryosphere.net/12/2955/2018/tc-12-2955-2018.pdf