Scientists surprised by the strength of earthquake-triggered tsunami in Sulawesi island

For story suggestions or custom animation requests, contact [email protected] Visit http://archive.nextanimationstudio.com to view News Direct's complete archive of 3D news animations.

RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN
Scientists have a theory about what might have caused the tsunami that followed the earthquake in Indonesia last week to be so destructive.

The 7.5-magnitude earthquake struck the center of the island of Sulawesi, triggering 6-meter-tall tsunami waves that crashed in Palu, reports the BBC.

The earthquake itself was a strike-slip quake, which means the ground breaks horizontally instead of vertically.

Scientists say strike-slip quakes often cause tsunamis that are less than 1 meter tall.

Scientists suspect the Indonesia earthquake may have triggered an underwater landslide that destabilized sediment underwater, causing it to break free and tumble.

Palu's bay's elongated shape also may have also worked to amplify the effect of the tsunami.

The earthquake and the tsunami have already caused substantial damage in Indonesia, with more than 1,000 people confirmed dead and many more trapped under collapsed infrastructure in Sulawesi.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. The epicenter of the earthquake along with tsunami waves.
2. Cross section of the earth and a slip and slide earthquake is shown.
3. Underwater landslide triggered by earthquake.
4. Palu Bay's elongated bay flashes red.

VOICEOVER (in English):
"The BBC reports the 7.5 magnitude earthquake struck in the center of the island of Sulawesi, triggering 6-meter tall tsunami waves that crashed in Palu City."

"The earthquake itself was a strike-slip quake, which means the ground breaks horizontally instead of vertically."

"Scientists suspect the earthquake may have triggered an underwater landslide that destabilized sediment underwater, causing it to break free and tumble."

"Palu's bay's elongated shape also may have also worked to amplify the effect of the tsunami."

SOURCES:The BBC, New York Times, Forbes, South China Morning Post,
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-45711190

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/30/world/asia/indonesia-tsunami-science.html

https://www.forbes.com/sites/robinandrews/2018/10/01/indonesian-tsunami-what-happened-how-to-survive-one-and-how-to-help/#3e7172664322

https://www.scmp.com/news/asia/southeast-asia/article/2166340/long-and-narrow-bay-likely-made-indonesia-tsunami-more