The European Union's law-making process explained

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RESTRICTIONS: Broadcast: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN Digital: NO USE JAPAN, NO USE TAIWAN
The European Union makes laws that shape 28 nations of Europe.

According to European Parliament information, E.U. legislation is ideated by the European Commission. After a law is drafted there, it's sent onto the European Parliament for a reading. If the parliament wants amendments, it will note them, before sending them onto the next step in the process.

The council may alter parliament's amendments to the draft, and send it back to them for a second reading. If parliament accepts, the proposal becomes law. They can also ask for further changes and if the Council accepts these, it becomes law.

If not, both can choose not to adopt the draft or enter into negotiations known as 'concilation'. During this, an equal amount of parliamentarians and council members attempt to agree on a joint text for the draft. If they can't agree, it isn't adopted.

If they do agree, the draft is sent back to both the parliament and council for a third and final reading. At this stage, no more amendments can be made to the draft. Both have to approve the draft text for it to become law. If either rejects it, the proposal is discarded.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Depiction of E.U. Commission and E.U. Parliament
2. Depiction of E.U. Parliament and E.U. Council reading a draft proposal
3. Depiction of E.U. 'concilation' process
4. Depiction of proposal becoming law

VOICEOVER (in English):

"E.U. legislation is ideated by the European Commission. After a law is drafted there, it's sent onto the European Parliament for a reading."
"If the parliament wants amendments, it will note them, before sending them onto the next step in the process."
"The draft proposal is then sent onto the European Council. This body comprises Europe's elected national leaders and one council president."
"The council may alter parliament's amendments to the draft, and send it back to them for a second reading. If parliament accepts, the proposal becomes law.
"They can also ask for further changes and if the Council accepts these, it becomes law."
"If not, both can choose not to adopt the draft or enter into negotiations known as concilation."
"During this, an equal amount of parliamentarians and council members attempt to agree on a joint text for the draft. If they can't agree, it isn't adopted."
"If they do agree, the draft is sent back to both the parliament and council for a third and final reading. At this stage, no more amendments can be made to the draft.
"Both have to approve the draft text for it to become law. If either rejects it, the proposal is discarded."
SOURCES: European Parliament, European Council
http://www.europarl.europa.eu/external/html/legislativeprocedure/default_en.htm
https://ec.europa.eu/info/law/law-making-process_en