Turkey fights back against 'sea snot' invasion

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Turkey has been hit by a plague of "sea snot" that is covering much of its Sea of Marmara with a thick layer of mucus-like sludge. And the gunk isn't just gross — it's also smothering animals underwater.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Marmara Sea vista with huge slime area in foreground, worker sucks up slime in sea of white slime
2. Map zoom from global to local, zooming in to Marmara Sea highlighted
3. Microscopic view of algae in water, adding sewage and heat on one side causes that side to grow exponentially
4. Boat moving in slime, leaving trail in slime, worker sucking slime through see-through pipe
5. Raw sewage from pipe plunging into ocean, side view of sewage plunging, spreading in ocean
6. Diver on surface, covered in slime, slime everywhere, slime strands under water, diver finds sea creatures covered in slime


VOICEOVER (in English):
The BBC reports that Turkey's President Erdogan has promised to save the country's shores from "sea snot" that has been building up in its waters.

A thick, slimy layer of the mucus-like matter is spreading over the Sea of Marmara near Istanbul, damaging marine life and the fishing industry.

This "sea snot", or marine mucilage, is a naturally-occurring green or white sludge that forms when algae is overloaded with nutrients as a result of hot weather and water pollution.

Turkey's recent outbreak over large areas of the Sea of Marmara is believed to be the biggest in history and is causing havoc for local communities.

Some fishermen are being prevented from working as it clogs up their motors and nets.

President Erdogan blamed untreated sewage being dumped into the sea, as well as rising temperatures, and urged officials to investigate.

His government has dispatched a 300-strong team to inspect potential sources of pollution.

Divers have reported that large numbers of fish and other species are dying from suffocation.

SOURCES: BBC, The Atlantic, Daily Sabah
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-57372677
https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2021/06/sea-slime-turkey/619256/
https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2021/06/photos-turkeys-sea-snot-disaster/619254/
https://www.dailysabah.com/turkey/turkey-to-pump-oxygen-into-marmara-sea-to-fight-sea-snot/news