What could happen under Net Neutrality repeal

Visit http://archive.nextanimationstudio.com or contact [email protected] to license this or any News Direct video
For story suggestions please contact [email protected]

RESTRICTIONS: NONE

The Federal Communications Commission has released regulations that would roll back net neutrality regulations passed by the agency two years ago.

Net Neutrality is the principle of an open internet where Internet Service Providers (ISPs) give consumers access to all content without favoring some sources or blocking others, according to USA Today. It also prohibits ISPs from throttling certain content over others.

In 2015, the FCC decided to regulate broadband service like a utility, similar to electricity and water, according to the New York Times.

The major broadband and telecom companies like AT&T and Comcast argue against net neutrality saying government regulation reduces the incentives to improve service.
Without net neutrality, the internet could become divided into two tiers: one with fast service and one without.

Larger internet and media companies as well as the affluent will be able to pay for the high-speed lane, while everyone else will have to use the slow lane.

The new rules would require ISPs to disclose any blocking, throttling and prioritization of content.

States are also prohibited from enacting their own net neutrality laws that conflict with the new FCC rules, USA Today reported.

The FCC will vote on December 14 to repeal current net neutrality rules.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Woman using the internet
2. Without net neutrality the internet could be divided into two tiers
3. People surfing the internet
4. ISPs would need to disclose blocking, throttling and prioritization

VOICEOVER (in English):
"The Federal Communications Commission has released regulations that would roll back net neutrality regulations."

"Without net neutrality, the internet could become divided into two tiers: one with fast service and one without."

"Larger internet and media companies as well as the affluent will be able to pay for the high-speed lane, while everyone else will have to use the slow lane."

"The new rules would require ISPs to disclose any blocking, throttling and prioritization of content."

SOURCES: USA Today, New York Times
https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/news/2017/04/26/what-net-neutrality-and-what-would-its-reversal-mean/100930220/
https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/news/2017/11/22/whats-stake-fccs-net-neutrality-vote/888870001/
https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/11/21/technology/net-neutrality-repeal-questions.html?referer=http://m.facebook.com/