Woman's eye infected with rare parasitic eye worm

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A 68-year-old woman in California is the second human to be infected with parasitic eye worms typically found in cattle, as scientists warn that it may be an emerging zoonotic disease in the U.S.

CNN reports that thelazia gulosa are parasitic worms typically found in cattle. They live on the surface of the eyeball, and produce larvae that stay in the tears.

Face flies that feed off the animal's eye secretions ingest the larvae, which develop into a more advanced stage while in the flies' digestive system.

The worms can enter a human host when an infected fly lands close to or in a person's eye.

So far, only 10 other cases of eye worms have been reported in the U.S., with none caused by thelazia gulosa until now.

Eye worms can be killed with anti-parasitic medicine, but may cause scarring. As such, patients are advised to just monitor the eyes and remove any worms.

The parasites have been known to cause vision loss and blindness in animals, but fortunately not in people.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Depiction of eye worms in cows' eyes, larvae in tears
2. Depiction of larvae being ingested by face flies
3. Depiction of woman being infected with eye worms via face flies
4. Woman removing eye worms

VOICEOVER (in English):

"Thelazia gulosa are parasitic worms typically found in cattle. They live on the surface of the eyeball, and produce larvae that stay in the tears."

"Face flies that feed off the animal's eye secretions ingest the larvae, which develop into a more advanced stage while in the flies' digestive system."

"The worms can enter a human host when an infected fly lands close to or in a person's eye."

"Eye worms can be killed with anti-parasitic medicine, but may cause scarring. As such, patients are advised to just monitor the eyes and remove any worms."

SOURCES:
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, The Oregonian, CNN, Reuters, Clinical Infectious Diseases
https://www.cdc.gov/dpdx/thelaziasis/index.html
http://www.oregonlive.com/trending/2018/02/14_cattle_worms_found_oregon_w.html
http://edition.cnn.com/2018/02/12/health/human-eye-worms/index.html
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-health-eyeworms/u-s-woman-found-with-eye-worm-previously-known-only-in-cattle-idUSKBN1FW2J5
https://academic.oup.com/cid/advance-article-abstract/doi/10.1093/cid/ciz469/5602294?redirectedFrom=fulltext#165085600