World's largest iceberg may soon break up

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It looks like the beginning of the end for the world's largest iceberg, the BBC reports.

New satellite images show Iceberg A-68 lost a 175 square km chunk of ice, which will likely be called Iceberg A-68c, between satellite passes on April 21 and April 22, according to images from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission.

Iceberg A-68 broke off from the Larsen Ice Shelf in July of 2017 and remained largely intact for three years as it drifted past the Antarctic Peninsula in the Weddell Sea. Today it is around 5,000 square km, almost four times the size of Greater London.

Currents in the Southern Ocean are now pushing the iceberg past the South Orkney Islands into increasingly warmer waters.

RUNDOWN SHOWS:
1. Location of Iceberg A-68 when Iceberg A-68c breaks off
2. Size comparison of Iceberg A-68 to Greater London, Cyprus and Hawaii
3. Iceberg A-68 calved from Antarctica's Larsen C Ice Shelf in July of 2017
4. Iceberg A-68 being pushed north by currents in the Southern Ocean

VOICEOVER (in English):
"It looks like the beginning of the end for the world's largest iceberg."

"New satellite images show Iceberg A-68 lost a 175 square km chunk of ice, which will likely be called Iceberg A-68c, between satellite passes on April 21 and April 22."

"When it first calved from Antarctica's Larsen C Ice Shelf, Iceberg A-68 was nearly 6,000 square km in size, according to images from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission."

"Today it is around 5,000 square km. That's almost four times the size of Greater London, or roughly half the size of the islands of Hawaii or Cyprus."

"The giant chunk of ice is 160 km long, but only a couple of hundred meters thick, making it remarkably thin for an iceberg of its size."

"Iceberg A-68 broke off from the Larsen Ice Shelf in July of 2017, losing a small piece called Iceberg A-68b shortly after it calved. Iceberg A-68 then remained largely intact for three years as it drifted past the Antarctic Peninsula in the Weddell Sea."

"Currents in the Southern Ocean are now pushing the iceberg past the South Orkney Islands. As it drifts into warmer waters, it is expected to fragment into smaller ice blocks, many of which could last for years among the ice surrounding Antarctica."

SOURCES: BBC, Weather Network, Copernicus Programme, NASA
https://ca.news.yahoo.com/satellite-images-reveal-iceberg-68s-202000789.html
https://adrianluckman.wordpress.com/2019/07/11/happy-second-birthday-iceberg-a68/
https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/146603/a-68a-holding-it-together